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A Timeline of Newspaper Closings & Calamities

News About Newspaper Closings, Bankruptcies & Downsizings

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Print journalism is in peril. Circulation is dropping, ad revenue is shrinking, and the industry has experienced an unprecedented wave of layoffs, bankruptcies and closings. Here, in reverse chronological order, is a timeline of stories about newspapers closings, bankruptcies & downsizings.

Ann Arbor News Closes

July 2009: The 174-year-old Ann Arbor News has printed its last edition. Hit hard by the recession, declining circulation and ad revenue and the migration of readers to the web, the paper printed its last edition and is being replaced by AnnArbor.com, a free website that will also publish a print edition on Thursdays and Sundays.

For Newspapers, Slide in Advertising Revenue Continues

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July 2009: There's more bad news for newspapers: Ad revenue was down for the first quarter of this year. Overall ad sales for print fell 30 percent in this first quarter of 2009 compared to the same quarter last year. Classified ad revenue, siphoned away by Craigslist, plunged 42 percent in that period.

NY Times Co. & Boston Globe Union Reach Deal

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May 2009: The New York Times Co. and the Boston Globe's largest union reach a tentative deal that would avert a threatened shutdown of the paper. But as part of the deal members of the Boston Newspaper Guild agreed to a hefty pay cut, unpaid furloughs and changes to lifetime job guarantee provisions that protect some 200 employees.

Papers' First-Quarter Earnings Reports Expected To Be Grim

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April 2009: First-quarter earnings figures for many newspaper companies are due out, and some papers will report losses of 30 percent, while losses of 20 percent or more will be common, The New York Times reports.

Chicago Tribune Planning Another 20 Percent Cut in Newsroom Staff

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April 2009: The Chicago Tribune plans to cut another 20 percent of its newsroom staff in an effort to reduce costs. But while journalists are being let go, the Trib hires a new spokeswoman, who had no comment on the cuts.

Philly Inquirer Owners Offer $50 Million To Boost Company Out of Bankruptcy

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April 2009: The owners of The Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com offer their major creditors $50 million to bring the company out of bankruptcy. The creditors are owed about $300 million by Philadelphia Newspapers L.L.C.

NY Times Threatens to Close Boston Globe Unless Cuts Are Made

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April 2009: The New York Times threatens to close the Boston Globe unless the newspaper's unions quickly agree to $20 million in concessions. The Globe, which is owned by The Times, is New England's largest newspaper. But like many other papers nationwide its ad revenues have plunged in recent years and it is now a money-loser.

Seattle P-I To Become a Web-Only Operation

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March 2009: The 146-year-old Seattle Post-Intelligencer shuts down its printing presses and becomes a news website with a far smaller reporting staff.

Philly Daily News to be Labeled an "Edition" of the Inquirer

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March 2009: In a cost-cutting measure, the Philadelphia Daily News, the city of brotherly love's scrappy tabloid, is labeled an edition of the larger Philadelphia Inquirer. The move allows the papers to save money on wire services.

Rocky Mountain News Closes

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February 2009: The Rocky Mountain News, Colorado's oldest newspaper, publishes its final edition. The News, which was founded in 1859, had been put up for sale in December after losing $16 million in 2008. No buyers stepped forward.

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